Volume 57 (January 2014)

Welcome to dgOnline, the electronic newsletter of the Digital Government Society. dgOnline is a quarterly summary of news and events of interest for the DG community. To submit material for inclusion in future issues, please send an email to Gabriel Puron-Cid at newsletter@dgsociety.org .

 

In this Issue:

  • DGSNA news
  • News
  • Research
  • Best Practices
  • Conferences and Calls for Participation
  • Job Opportunities
  • Funding Opportunities
  • Other Resources

 

DGSNA News

 

REMINDER: Call for Papers dg.o 2014

15th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research

Open Innovations and Sustainable Development in Government: 

Experiences from around the World

Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE)

Aguascalientes City, Aguascalientes, Mexico

Wednesday – Saturday, June 18-21, 2014

 

Submission deadline: February 1st, 2014 Extended until February 16th

Home page: http://dgsociety.org/conference/2014

General inquiries: dgo2014@easychair.orgThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Twitter: DGSociety, #dgo2014

Paper submissions: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=dgo2014

Governments around the world are embracing different “open innovations” to foster sustainable development such as open government, policy informatics, smart technologies, semantic technologies, web services applications, open and transparent government, social media, crowd sourcing, data integration, visualizations, analytics, new collaboration models and practices, data sharing, computing infrastructure models, and cyber-security.

With the idea of exploring these experiences in the public sphere, the Digital Government Society (DGS) announces the 15th Annual International Conference on Digital Government Research - dg.o 2014. The dg.o conferences are an established forum for presentation, discussion, and demonstration of interdisciplinary e-Government and political participation research, technology innovation, applications, and practice. Each year the conference combines:

 

·         Presentations of effective partnerships and collaborations among government professionals and agencies, university researchers, relevant businesses, and NGOs, as well as grassroots citizen groups, to advance the practice of e-Government.

·         Presentations and discussions on new research on e-Government as an interdisciplinary domain that lies at the intersections of information technology research, social and behavioral science research, and the challenges and missions of government.

·         A showcase of e-Government projects, implementations, and initiatives that bring together the research and practitioner communities, demonstrate the effectiveness and/or challenges of e-Government, and offer best practices.

 

Democracy today faces unprecedented opportunities and challenges. New technologies provide citizens, governments, industry and non-governmental organizations with the opportunity to redefine the relationship between government and the public that they serve, create innovative and customer-focused services, encourage transparency, promote participatory democracy, facilitate the co-design of services, form new partnerships in service delivery, streamline operations and reduce costs, and build trust in government. But harnessing and implementing technologies effectively raises a number of policy, technology, and governance challenges. This year, the conference program will focus on research and practice related to big data, open innovations, sustainable development in governments and non-profit organizations. The availability of large quantity of data, growth in computing power, and advanced analysis and presentation tools have given rise to new opportunities for developing policy instruments and creating public-private partnerships to improve government services as well as to create new, innovative practice. Furthermore, the combination of new technology, policy tools, collaborative governance and innovative practices could play transformational roles in fostering sustainable development around the world.

 

Submissions addressing this theme could include but are not limited to: big data, open government, sustainable development, policy informatics, smart technologies for governments, semantic technologies for e-government, web services applications, open and transparent government; social media and public participation; effective use of social media by governments, citizens and organizations; crowd sourcing for government decision making; transformative government; models of collaboration among government, industry, NGOs, and citizens; data integration, visualizations, and analytics for government decision making or public collective problem solving; agile and flexible government; financial/economic/social policy making; policy and governance issues that enable, facilitate, and promote smart government; government productivity and effectiveness; service quality and customer-centric e-Government; social and health infrastructure; global government collaboration models and practices; infrastructure for data sharing among government agencies or non-governmental organizations or citizens groups; computing infrastructure models, cyber-security and project management; IT-enabled government management and operations, and interest in program execution; IT and tools to support government security; and methods to measure and evaluate success in e-Government and private and public participation in governance.

 

In addition, we welcome submissions from the broader domain of digital government research. We invite completed research papers, papers describing management and practice, policy and case studies, on-going research posters, and live demonstrations that demonstrate the use of technology to promote innovative e-Government services. We particularly encourage submissions on interdisciplinary and crosscutting topics. We also encourage the submission of suggestions for panels, and pre-conference tutorials and workshops.

 

Accepted papers are published in the ACM Proceedings Digital Library, and selected papers will appear in leading journals such as Government Information Quarterly and Information Polity.

 

The conference has six thematic tracks, which accept full research papers as well as management case studies and policy papers (see below for paper submission types), and one track for panel proposals. Each track has two co-chairs who are responsible for managing the submission and review process for their track. The conference also accepts work in progress and short descriptions of applications on any topic. We also welcome proposals for workshops and tutorials, which can be submitted directly to the Easychair system. Feel free to get in contact with any track chairs for guidance.

 

Track 1. Social Media and Government

Track chairs: Andrea Kavanaugh and Rodrigo Sandoval

The use of social media has been growing rapidly and globally. Governments at all levels have been using these media for public administration and for outreach to citizens.  Citizens, businesses and voluntary associations have been using them to share information, ask questions, and to collaborate on problem solving in neighborhoods, states, industries and nations. The growing use of social media has created new challenges and opportunities for all users, e.g., changes in regulations and policies, marketing, and more diverse perspectives and feedback. However the staggering number and diversity of messages and topics generated is difficult to process and make sense of, not only on a day-to-day basis, but also during crises. Social media have also offered broader, more diverse participation in collective problem solving and governance. This track welcomes research and practice papers addressing a range of similar or related topics on social media analysis on content, metrics, case studies or theoretical models to advance this area of research.

 

Track 2. Transformation and Open Government

Track chair: Marijn Janssen, Natalie Helbig and Vishanth Weerakkody

Many governments are working toward a vision of government-wide transformation that strives to achieve an open, transparent, accountable government while providing demand-driven services. To be successful in this vision fundamental changes are necessary in practice and new research that examines governments as open systems seeking participation and interaction with their environment is needed. The track solicits papers addressing the issue of public sector transformation between government and the environment.

 

Track 3. Emerging Topics

Track chairs: John C. Bertot, Paul Jaeger and Chris Reddick

The continual development of new technologies, big data applications, policies, and management practices keep digital government research and practice in a state of perpetual evolution. This evolution also provides governments with ways in which to cultivate innovative, smart, and transformational government services. The Emerging Topics track seeks submissions that provide insights into emerging digital government research and practice.

 

Track 4. Organizational Factors, Adoption Issues and Digital Government Impacts

Track chair: Chris Hinnant and Lei Zheng

Public organizations employ information and communication technologies (ICT) to facilitate communication and transactions with many stakeholders such as residents, private sector businesses, non-profit organizations, and other government agencies. While recent digital government research has often focused on understanding the external impacts of ICT adoption by government, the adoption and implementation of new ICT by public organizations is influenced by organizational factors such as the availability of resources (i.e. funding, technological knowledge, and personnel), leadership, and the organization’s technological culture. This track solicits research that examines the organizational factors that influence the adoption and implementation of new ICT as well as the impact of new ICT on the organizational processes, effectiveness, and innovativeness of public organizations.  Research in this tract may examine the adoption, use, and organizational impacts of a variety of innovative technologies and practices including but not limited to social media technologies, citizen-centric technologies, virtual collaborative work practices, and technologies that facilitate the collection and analysis of large data sets. Furthermore, the tract is also interested in the adoption of innovative policies or practices that seek to facilitate the strategic use of ICT by public organizations.

 

Track 5. Smart Cities, Smart Citizens and Smart Government

Track chair: Soon Ae Chun and Sehl Mellouli

Cities, governments and citizens face the challenging issues of sustainability as the existing infrastructure systems are quickly surpassed by growing populations, heightened demands for services and resources, and growing interdependencies of different systems.  The concept of smart cities, smart governments and smart citizens is to utilize technology to create innovative solutions to the quality of life and sustainability and achieve not only the operational efficiencies but also transforming policy development and governance.    This track aims to facilitate theoretical, empirical and technical discussions on approaches towards the smart government, smart cities, smart community and smart citizens. Topics include but not limited to the technical and policy innovations in the area of energy, transportation, health, education, public safety, buildings, urban planning, environment, business, cyber security and privacy, and others.

 

Track 6. Panels

Track chairs: Teresa Harrison and Jana Hrdinova

Panel proposals may address themes or topics related to any of the tracks for the conference. Additionally, we welcome panel proposals that put a spotlight on practice and application. Proposals from practitioners at all levels of government featuring experiences with, perspectives on, and evaluations of digital government practice are encouraged. Individuals interested in submitting panel proposals are invited to consult the panel co-chairs about their ideas prior to developing their submissions.

 

IMPORTANT DATES

·         February 1, 2014 - Papers, workshops, tutorials, and panel proposals due (For panel proposals, please send expressions of interest in proposing a panel earlier, if possible, to Teresa Harrison (tharrison@albany.eduThis e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it )March 15, 2014 - Application deadline for 2014 Doctoral Colloquium

·         March 15, 2014 - Papers, workshops, tutorials, and panel proposals notifications

·         March 30, 2014 - Posters and demo proposals due

·         April 15, 2014 - Camera-ready manuscripts due

·         April 15, 2014 - Notification for acceptance into 2012 Doctoral Colloquium

·         April 15, 2014 - Poster and demo acceptance notifications

·         May 5, 2014 - Conference hotel block closes - make your bookings before this deadline!

·         May 20, 2014 - Early registration closes!

·         June 18-21, 2014 - Dg.o 2014 conference!

 

SUBMISSION TYPES AND FORMATS

·         Research papers (maximum of 10 pages)

·         Management, Case Study, or Policy papers (maximum of 6 pages)

·         Panel descriptions (maximum of 4 pages)

·         Posters (maximum of 2 pages)

·         System demonstrations (maximum of 2 pages)

·         Pre-Conference tutorial proposals (maximum of 2 pages)

·         Pre-Conference workshop proposals (maximum of 2 pages)

·         Doctoral colloquium application (maximum of 10 pages)

 

Submissions must not exceed the maximum number of pages specified for each type of submission in camera-ready ACM Proceedings format (double column, single spaced pages). Please do not use page numbers. Paper titles should be on the first page of text, rather than on a separate cover page.

·         Research and Policy papers will be reviewed through a double blind review process. Therefore, author names and contact information must be omitted from all submissions. Authors must identify the topic(s) being addressed in the paper to assist the program committee in the review process.

·         All other submissions should follow the same ACM proceedings camera-ready format with author names included on the paper.

·         All accepted submissions will appear in the proceedings, and authors are expected to present their work. At least one author for each accepted paper must register before the camera ready version is due in order for it to be included in the proceedings.

Submissions are through: https://www.easychair.org/conferences/?conf=dgo2014

 

Research papers (maximum 10 pages) – blind review

These submissions report innovative digital government research results in the form of a formal scholarly paper. Papers on any digital government topic and all research methodologies are welcome. Relevance to digital government problems, goals, or policies must be explicit.

 

Management, case study, or policy papers (maximum 6 pages) – blind review

These submissions describe and evaluate practical digital government projects or initiatives, discuss major policy themes, or present and evaluate management approaches to digital government initiatives and programs.

 

Panels (maximum 4 pages)

Proposals should include information about the theme and goals of the panel, a summary of the digital government issues or questions that the panel will address, statements about the value of the discussion to conference attendees and how well suited the topic is to a panel discussion. In addition, the proposal should include information about the expertise of the moderator and panelists in the selected issues. Please include names, institutional affiliations, addresses, email, and phone contact numbers of the contact person, moderator, and presenter(s).

 

Posters (maximum of 2 pages)

The poster session, held in conjunction with the system demonstrations, allows presenters to discuss research in progress, application projects, or government policies and program initiatives in one-to-one conversations with other participants at the conference. The 2-page summaries should outline the nature of the research, policy, or project and describe why the work will be of interest to dg.o attendees. Posters prepared for the conference should measure approximately 36" x 48." Each poster station is provided with a table and an easel. Selected poster submissions may be asked to give an oral presentation in the conference sessions.

 

System Demonstrations (maximum 2 pages)

System demonstrations are held concurrently with the poster session to the accompaniment of good food and professional fellowship. The 2-page summaries should outline the nature of the system and describe why the demonstration is likely to be of interest to dg.o attendees. Demonstrations of interest include systems under development or in active use in research or practice domains. Submissions should include authors' names and contact information according to that format. Each station is provided with a table, an easel, and Internet access. Monitors will be available for rent. Selected demo submissions may be asked to give an oral presentation in the conference sessions.

 

Pre-conference Tutorials (maximum 2 pages)

dg.o tutorials are half- or full-day presentations that offer deeper insight into e-Government research, practice, research methodologies, technologies or field experience. In particular, tutorials are intended to provide insights into good practices, research strategies, uses of particular technologies such as social media, and other insights into e-Government that would benefit researchers and practitioners.

 

Pre-conference Research or Management Workshops (maximum 2 pages)

We invite workshop proposals on any e-Government research or management topic. Workshops are half- or full-day events intended to offer interactive sessions, in which the workshop host and participants discuss and engage in activities designed to facilitate joint learning and further exploration of a particular subject. Individuals proposing workshops will assume the responsibility of identifying and selecting participants for the workshop and for conducting workshop activities.

 

Doctoral Colloquium (maximum 10 pages, not including references, tables and figures) The Doctoral Colloquium is a highly interactive full-day forum in which Ph.D. students meet and discuss their work with each other and with senior faculty from a variety of disciplines associated with digital government research. The colloquium is planned for Wednesday June 18, 2014. PhD students can submit papers describing their planned or in-progress doctoral dissertation covering any research areas relevant to digital government. Ideally, student participants will have completed one or two years of doctoral study or progressed far enough in their research to have a structured proposal idea and perhaps some preliminary findings, but have not reached the stage of defending their dissertations. We expect students at this stage of study will gain the most value from feedback on their work and from the more general discussions of doctoral programs and scholarly careers. See the detailed announcement for complete information on the colloquium and how to submit an application. Material provided in applications to the doctoral colloquium will not be published in the proceedings. However, we encourage students to submit finished research to one of the paper tracks or as a poster or demo.

 

OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS

·         All accepted management or policy papers, research papers, student papers, panels, posters, and system demonstrations will be published in the printed proceedings and included in the ACM digital library. Selected papers may be invited for a journal special issue.

·         Outstanding achievement awards will be presented in the categories Research papers, Management and policy papers, Posters, and System demonstrations. Papers that reflect the theme of the conference, from E-Government to Smart Government, will be preferred. Other selection criteria include the interdisciplinary and innovative nature of the work, its contribution to and balance between theory (rigor) and practice (relevance), the importance and reach of the topic, and the quality of the writing for communicating to a broad audience.

CONFERENCE ORGANIZATION

The dg.o 2014 conference management team includes:

·         Conference Co-chairs:

·         Scott Robertson, University of Hawaii

·         Gabriel Puron-Cid, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas

·         Program Chairs:

·         J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas

·         Jing Zhang, Clark University.

·         Andrea Kavanaugh, Virginia Tech

·         Chris Hinnant, Florida State University

·         Chris Reddick, University of Texas San Antonio

·         John Bertot, University of Maryland College Park

·         Lei Zheng, Fundan

·         Marijn Janssen, Delft University

·         Natalie Helbig, Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany

·         Paul Jaeger, University of Maryland College Park

·         Rodrigo Sandoval, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México

·         Sehl Mellouli, Laval University

·         Soon Ae Chun, City University of New York

·         Vishanth Weerakkody, Brunel University

·         Teresa Harrison, University at Albany

·         Track Chairs:

·         Panel Chairs:

·         Sharon Dawes, Center for Technology in Government, University at Albany

·         Björn Niehaves, Hertie School of Governance

·         J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas

·         Workshop and Tutorial Chair - Soon Ae Chun, City University of New York

·         Poster and Demo Chair - Gabriel Puron Cid, CIDE

·         Doctoral Colloquium Chairs:

 

News

 

Best Week Ever in #SocialGov: December Edition (12/13/13)

December installment of an ongoing seriescharting the programs, events and people that make the emerging field of social media and data in government an exciting place to serve the public

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/13/best-week-ever-in-socialgov-december-edition/

 

The 2nd Annual America COMPETES Report to Congress (01/07/2013)

The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) recently released the second annual report to Congress on the Federal Government’s use of prizes in the public sector to engage citizen solvers and harness American ingenuity. This report reflects the hard work of agencies on open innovation in fiscal year 2012.

 https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-2nd-annual-america-competes-report-to-congress-registration-9929671916

 

Advancing Forward: Best of Social Media 2013 and Beyond (12/31/2013)

2013 was a very good year for theSocialGov community. As a testament to it’s success, the community recently met and expanded beyond 500 members from more than 130 agencies.

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/31/advancing-forward-best-of-social-media-in-2013-and-beyond/

 

Highlights from 2013 #TCOpen Coding Competition (12/30/2013)

A fun, insider look at the best coders, designers, data scientists and more from#TCO13. With video!

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/30/highlights-from-2013-tcopen-coding-competition/

 

2013 NORAD Tracks Santa App (12/24/2013) 

Fifty-eight years ago NORAD began tracking Santa’s whereabouts. This year the agency is offering children and their parents a visually enhanced mobile app on 3 platforms and website(non-mobile) experience to follow along.

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/24/the-2013-norad-tracks-santa-app/

 

Research

 

Live Tweeting Government Events - The Dos and Don’ts

Live tweeting is using Twitter to report on an event, speech, or presentation as it is happening.When done right, live tweeting can help followers feel like they’re actually a part of the event.

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/10/live-tweeting-government-events-dos-and-donts/

 

Mobile Gaming Habits (12/13/13)

Playing games is one of the most popular activities on mobile devices. A recent study by App Annie and IDC dives deeper into the use habits of mobile gamers.

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/12/mobile-gaming-habits/

 

Social Media Update 2013 (12/30/2013)

Findings on social networking site usage and adoption from a new survey from the Pew Research Center’s Internet Project.

http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Social-Media-Update.aspx#.UsW5rD6r2Gs.twitter

 

 

Best Practices

 

Federal Agency Mobile Gov Trends in 2013 (01/01/2014)

 

MobileGov tech trends that shaped 2013 and will move us forward into 2014. Big trends include code sharing, native apps, and responsive design.

http://blog.howto.gov/2014/01/01/trends-on-tuesday-federal-agency-mobile-gov-trends-in-2013/

 

Citizen Needs Come First for UK Websites (12/09/13)

 

Mike Bracken, creator and director of the United Kingdom’s Government Digital Service, offers a key lesson for designing and developing “democracy” websites.

http://blog.howto.gov/2013/12/09/citizen-needs-come-first-for-uk-websites/

 

Challenge.gov Webinar Series: What Drives Competitors (11/19/2013)

 

Learn the key motivators and incentives that influence people to enter prize competitions. Is it for personal satisfaction, reputation, career-advancement, or simply the money? The Harvard-NASA Tournament Lab has used various methods to research what motivates challenge entrants. Jin Paik, manager for the Harvard-NASA Tournament Lab, shares findings on what makes competitors tick.

http://www.howto.gov/training/classes/what-drives-competitors

 

Conferences and Calls for Participation

 

Extended Submission Due Date: January 15, 2014

EXTENDED FULL CHAPTER SUBMISSION DUE DATE: April 15, 2014

Book’s Title: Information and Communication Technologies in Public Administration: Innovations from Developed Countries

Publisher: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group

[More information on: http://dde.teilar.gr/main.aspx?category=402&UICulture=en-US]

 

A book edited by: Christopher G. Reddick, University of San Antonio Texas, U.S.A. and Leonidas G. Anthopoulos, Technological Education Institute of Thessaly, Greece

 INTRODUCTION AND PURPOSE OF THE BOOK:

For more than two decades, governments in developed countries have used Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) to change public sector organizations. ICT has been used to improve the performance in delivering effective or highly sophisticated public services; reengineering or optimizing their internal organization and processes; engaging social participation and dialogue; opening policy making and internal outcomes to the public; and enhancing public sector’s efficiency in general. These efforts are mainly based on governments using ICT for strategic and program planning by impacting citizens and businesses. These efforts have been commonly branded as electronic government (e-Government). Time showed that these government acts have evolved from “e” to “connected”, then to “transforming” and now to “open” [Government], and this evolution keeps going.

Public administration and ICT efforts have dramatically changed the way governments interact with citizens and businesses. This book aims to explore the impact of this evolution via examining intra-organizational results with regards to internal public sector change management; inter-organizational affects with regard to cross-border developments, supra-national or international collaboration and affairs’ changes; social outcomes concerning service delivery improvements, adoption and engagement, trust and privacy; business outcomes with regard to ICT industry engagement in this arena; and academic involvement with regard to innovative technological developments.

In this order, the aim of this book is to illustrate the theoretical context, the existing state and current issues and trends, accompanied by innovative and forthcoming developments (norms, policies, and standards) in public administration with regard to the ICT. More specifically, it will not just examine e-Government domain, but it will depict innovative solutions with added value and impact to the public administration through ICT. In this order, theoretical chapters, empirical evidence and selected case studies from leading scholars and practitioners in the field showing the “big picture” of public administration and ICT in developed countries will be examined in this book.

 

STATEMENT OF AIMS:

This book aims to illustrate recent and innovative issues in regards to public administration and ICT. In order to capture the “big picture,” facts and trends from the developed world will be requested and address the following research questions:

1) How Has Public Administration and ICT Evolved? Theoretical Perspectives

Chapters will deal with recent ICT trends in the public administration, such as adoption and user satisfaction, big and linked data management in the public sector, social media utilization for a more effective democracy, standardization and ontologies, inclusion and participation, and so forth. Literature reviews would also be welcome in order to explore the existing major schools of thought in ICT and public administration and their recent perspectives to this domain. Additionally, criticisms with regard to existing failures in meeting citizen expectations and project effective management will be analyzed. For instance, governments have not succeeded in solving existing human problems effectively (i.e., poverty and peace), why should we expect them to succeed in e-Government missions?

 2) Who perform best? Cases from the Developed Countries

Chapters with respective successful cases from the developed countries will be requested to illustrate how the academy and industry have succeeded in meeting government ICT in local and central government as well as supranational and international affairs in this context. Moreover, frameworks and data regarding standardization and performance measurement at national, supranational and international levels will be welcome in this book’s part and show how ICT in public administration has progressed and what findings are extracted.

 3) What’s coming up next? Trends and Innovative Prospects

Chapters with innovative approaches and ideas that can lead to the next generation of ICT solutions in public administration will be presented. Cutting edge research projects will be also welcome in this book’s part. Moreover, solutions with regard to recent crucial issues such as electronic identification (eID), privacy protection and customized/personalized service delivery will be especially welcome.

 AUDIENCE FOR THE BOOK

The audience for this book is students, researchers, public sector professionals and managers in public administration/management programs across the developed world, with a focus on North America, Europe, Australia, and Japan. There will be a third market of information systems students that are interested in the technologies needed to create more efficient and effective governments. On the other hand, professionals and managers from both the private and public sectors are expected to be interested in this book due to the continuous analysis of existing and forthcoming e-strategies (i.e., recent European Digital Agenda and Horizon 2020 planning, management and implementation).

RECOMMENDED TOPICS:

Topics to be discussed in this book include (but are not limited to) the following:

PART A: How Has Public Administration and ICT Evolved? Theoretical Perspectives

·         Schools of thought and challenges to e-Government theory

·         Skepticism with regard to existing achievements compared to expectations from ICT in public administration: analysis of failures and proposed solutions

·         Social media. How the power of masses impact governments and public administration?

·         Big and linked data management

·         Openness (policies, openness, transparency, open data, open source, open innovation, etc.)

·         Transformation, personalization, interconnection and future promises

·         Rising challenges and threats in ICT and public administration

PART B: Who perform best? Cases from the Developed Countries

·         Innovations in Developed counties

·         Case study of Public Administration and ICT issues in the U.S.

·         Case study of Innovations in Public Administration and ICT in Europe

·         Comparative case study of experiences in U.S., U.K., Europe, and Australia

·         Asian Innovations in Public Administration and ICT

PART C: What’s coming up next? Trends and Innovative Prospects

·         Research Innovations and trends

·         Innovative ideas that attract scientific attention (i.e., big, linked and open/next data management)

·         Social media and social networking capitalization exemplars and platforms that enhance citizen engagement, establish e-service execution, etc.

·         The role of the cloud services in public administration

·         Approaches to recent public administration challenges (i.e., eID, privacy, security, transparency, cross-government affairs etc.)

 

SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:

Prospective authors should email chris.reddick@utsa.edu and lanthopo@teilar.gr a copy of a 250 word proposed chapter abstract on or before January 15, 2014. Their chapter proposal should clearly outline the topic that the author(s) would like to examine and how the topic relates to one of the three themes noted above. Author(s) of accepted chapter proposals will be notified by January 31, 2014.

 Full chapters for this book on Information and Communication Technologies in Public Administration: Innovations from Developed Countries must be submitted on or before April 15, 2014. All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. Results of the peer reviews will be announced to authors by July 31, 2014. The final copy of their chapter will be due by September 1, 2014.

 INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE PUBLISHER’s GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at http://www.crcpress.com/resources/authors.  All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis.

PUBLISHER: CRC PRESS, Taylor & Francis Group.

 Important Dates

Extended Chapter Proposals Due:                        January 15, 2014

Notification of Accepted Chapter Proposals:          January 31, 2014

Extended Full Chapters Due:                             April 15, 2014

Peer Review Results:                                          July 31, 2014

Final Revised Chapters Due:                               September 1, 2014

 

Inquiries and submissions should be emailed to

Christopher G. Reddick, University of San Antonio Texas, U.S.A.

E-mail: chris.reddick@utsa.edu  

and

Leonidas G. Anthopoulos, Technological Education Institute of Thessaly, Greece

E-mail: lanthopo@teilar.gr

  

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Public Service Innovations through ICT Track

The 18th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS 2014)

Chengdu, China

Conference: June 24-28, 2014

Paper Submission Deadline: February 15, 2014

 Track on Public Service Innovations through ICT

Over 15 years of electronic government (e-government) research has witnessed the strategic and innovative use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to change public administration practices. These reforms have been found in both developed and developing countries at all levels of government. These innovations have shown real challenges in realizing the potential benefits of e-government for public service delivery. In this Public Service Innovation through ICT Track, we aim to explore public service innovations through ICT use in government, by calling for theoretical and empirical e-government research studies on developed and developing countries worldwide, including public service innovations in the Asia Pacific region. In reflecting the major theme of the 2014

Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS), the proposed Track aims to encourage leading-edge academic researchers worldwide to advance research on public service innovations through ICT in government. 

 Suggested Topics include but not limited to

 

· Service innovations in public administration

· Service innovations through open data policies and open data applications

· Service innovations through big data analytics

· Service innovations in ICT-enabled crisis, disaster and catastrophe management

· Service innovations for the vulnerable populations such as the aged and people with disabilities

· Leveraging social media in government to enhance citizen engagement and citizen co-production of public services

· Leveraging social media in government to transform public policy governance

· Social media-enabled crowdsourcing for service innovations

· Clouds in government for meeting the demands for enhanced service efficiency and service flexibility

· Smart governments, smart cities and smart communities

· Measurement of service innovations through multi-research methods

· The role of leadership and organizational culture in cultivating service innovations in government

· Transparent and accountable investments in service innovations

· Service innovation challenges in public administration

 

Fast-Track Review for Journal Publication

The best papers from this Track can be fast-track reviewed for publication in the

Special Issue on "Public Service Innovations through Information and Communications Technology: Theory and Practice" in the International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age(Christopher G. Reddick, Editor-in-Chief). The IJPADA is published by IGI Global. 

 Track Co-Chairs

Dr. Akemi Takeoka Chatfield, University of Wollongong (Australia) akemi@uow.edu.au

Professor Dr. Christopher G. Reddick, The University of Texas at San Antonio (USA)

Associate Professor Dr. Hans J. (Jochen) Scholl, The University of Washington (USA)

Professor Dr. Toshio Obi, Waseda University (Japan)

Dr. Jazem Alanazi, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia)

Please copy/paste the following URL into your web browser: http://pacis2014.org/initial.php for Initial Submission Guidelines–PACIS 2014

Call For Chapters - New Book - Smarter as the New Urban Agenda: A Comprehensive View of the 21st Century City

 CALL FOR CHAPTER PROPOSALS

Proposal Submission Deadline: January 6, 2014

 

Smarter as the New Urban Agenda:

A Comprehensive View of the 21st Century City

 A book edited by

J. Ramon Gil-Garcia, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas, Mexico joseramon.gil@cide.edu

Theresa A. Pardo, Center for Technology in Government, State University of New York, USA tpardo@ctg.albany.edu

Taewoo Nam, Myongji University, Korea namtaewoo@mju.ac.kr

To be published by Springer: www.springer.com

This publication is part of the Public Administration and Information Technology Book Series http://www.springer.com/series/10796

Series editor Prof. Christopher Reddick, The University of Texas at San Antonio, USA

 Introduction

Currently half of the world’s population lives in cities and the trajectory of further urbanization is unprecedented.  These facts raise a number of important questions and challenges for the sustainable development and livability of cities.  The world’s cities in general suffer from a multitude of issues threatening such goals; aging infrastructure, scarce resources and competing priorities among them. Cites are working to become smarter through a new agenda focused on improving conveniences, facilitating mobility, creating process efficiencies, conserving energy, improving the quality of air and water, identifying problems and fixing them quickly, recovering rapidly from disasters, collecting data to make better decisions, deploying resources effectively, and sharing data to enable collaboration across entities and domains.

 Becoming a “smarter city” is being pursued around the world as part of new urban agendas aimed at addressing these issues and threats. Many cities are benefitting from such agendas, some are struggling under the weight of them.  A comprehensive view of a smarter city encompasses innovation in management and policy as well as technology and must acknowledge how the context of a specific city shapes the data, technological, organizational and policy aspects of that city.  Little research on cities discusses innovation in management and policy while the literature on technology innovation is abundant; little is known about inevitable risks from innovation, strategies to innovate while avoiding risks, and contexts underlying innovation and risks.

 This book takes a comprehensive perspective and attempts to bridge the gap between sound research and practice expertise in the area of smarter cities and innovation in policy, management, technology and data aspects. We welcome chapters encompassing conceptual approaches, theoretical frameworks, empirical research, and case studies of cities from all around the globe.

Objective of the Book

This book will provide one of the first comprehensive views of the 21st Century City and how city governments are working to become “smarter”. The overall objective of the book is to provide a coherent collection of theories and concepts for understanding and researching twenty-first century city governments pursuing an innovation agenda organized around the idea of becoming “smarter” as well as outline innovative methodologies for the analysis and evaluation of smart city initiatives. The compilation of high quality chapters covering cases, concepts, methodologies, theories, experiences and practical recommendations on topics related to cities world-wide and their efforts to become smarter through the use of technology and related organizational and policy innovations will contribute to the efforts of those seeking to understand and lead 21st century cities.

 Target Audience

The target audience for this book is academics and professionals who want to improve their understanding of smart city initiatives at all levels and branches of city government and in very different political, economic, and cultural contexts.  More specifically, there are two primary audiences for the book.  First, researchers and students in the digital government field and various disciplines, e.g., public administration, political science, communication, information science, administrative sciences and management, sociology, computer science, information technology and urban planning among others, seeking a comprehensive account of topics related to cities engaged in “smart city” initiatives. Second, government officials and public managers seeking practical recommendations and context specific lessons, based on rigorous studies that contain insights and guidance for the development, management, and evaluation of complex smart cities initiatives.

 Recommended topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

•             Theories and analytical frameworks to study smart cities

•             Fundamental concepts about smart city initiatives

•             Rigorous empirical studies about smart cities

•             Case studies of smart city initiatives

•             Emergent technologies for smart cities

•             Research-based practical recommendations for smart cities

•             Evaluation tools and strategies for smart cities initiatives

•             Public value assessment models for smart city initiatives

 

Submission Procedure

Researchers will be invited to submit on or before January 6, 2014, a 2-3 page chapter proposal clearly explaining the mission and concerns of his or her proposed chapter. Please add a small bio and full contact info of each of the authors. The accepted proposals will be notified on or before January 20, 2014 about the status of their submission and sent chapter guidelines. Full chapters are expected to be submitted by March 3, 2014. All submitted chapters will be reviewed on a double-blind review basis. Contributors may also be requested to serve as reviewers for this project.

 Publisher

This book is scheduled to be published by Springer. For additional information regarding the publisher, please visit www.springer.com. This publication is anticipated to be released in 2014.

 Important Dates

January 6, 2014:               Proposal Submission Deadline

January 20, 2014:             Notification of Proposal Acceptance

March 3, 2014:                  Full Chapter Submission

May 12, 2014:                   Review Results Returned

June 16, 2014:                   Revised Chapter Submission

July 14, 2014:                     Final Acceptance/Rejection Notification

August 18, 2014:              Final Chapter Submission with All Materials

 

Inquiries and submissions can be forwarded electronically (Word document) to:

 Dr. J. Ramon Gil-Garcia

Department of Public Administration

Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas

Carretera México-Toluca No. 3655, Col. Lomas de Santa Fe, 01210 México, D.F., MEXICO

Tel.: +52 (55) 5727-9800, Ext. 2311  •  Fax: +52 (55) 5727-9873

E-mail: egovernment@cide.edu and joseramon.gil@cide.edu

 

International Perspectives on Homeland Security in a Digital Age: Issues and Implications for Policy and Governance

Government Information Quarterly (GIQ) is seeking scholarly manuscripts for a special issue on International Perspectives on Homeland Security in a Digital Age, scheduled for publication in January 2015. GIQ is an international journal that examines the intersection of policy, information technology, government, and the public. In particular, GIQ focuses on how policies affect government information flows and the availability of government information; the use of technology to create and provide innovative government services; the impact of information technology on the relationship between the governed and those governing; and the increasing significance of information policies and information technology in relation to democratic practices. More information regarding GIQ is available at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/govinf. GIQ is SSCI indexed and has an impact factor of 1.910.

The editors for the special issue are: Dr. John Carlo Bertot (University of Maryland College Park), Dr. Paul T. Jaeger (University of Maryland College Park), and Dr. Jeffrey Seifert (Congressional Research Service).

Scope

This special issue targets high-quality research on International Perspectives on Homeland Security in a Digital Age. Digital technologies enable a range of surveillance, intelligence, eavesdropping, and data gathering techniques to ensure national and international security.  These techniques, however, create tensions between security, civil liberties, privacy rights, and other key policy issues. Legislative efforts to keep pace with technological change are often inadequate to both meet advances in technologies and maintain a balance with societal and individual rights. Moreover, as recent disclosures through unauthorized leaks show, the public is not always informed of key elements of security efforts, running counter to open and transparent government. The special issue seeks manuscripts that explore the intersection of security techniques and technologies, policy, and civil liberties.

In particular, the special issue seeks to: 1) Bring together international high quality research to produce theoretical and empirical insights on aspects related to the adoption, use, results, and impacts of homeland security techniques and approaches, with a particular emphasis on policy, as opposed to technical, aspects; and 2) Provide an integrated perspective on homeland security in a digital age. To do so, the issue uses the structure that follows, based on three main aspects: topics, tools, and goals. Submissions should consider technical aspects in the context of social and policy implications of the different tools and applications. 

Topics

Submitted manuscripts may cover one or more of the following topics or any other topic related to the main focus of the special issue:

·  Theories, frameworks, and models for Homeland Security. What theories, frameworks, and/or models can be applied to improve the analysis and understanding of homeland security in a digital age?

·  Policies that enable and govern homeland security. Securing the homeland in a digital context implies new policy and governance structures. Often these are crafted with minimal public input and debate. What are the constitutional, legal, and social implications of homeland security policies?

·  Governance and oversight strategies for homeland security. What mechanisms ensure that there is appropriate oversight over security agencies and the techniques they use? What accountability measures can ensure that the public trust is maintained?

·  Openness and transparency. Secrecy and transparency are in perpetual tension, representing opposite values that are invoked to achieve nonequivalent policy goals.  How do governments remain open, transparent, and accountable when engaging in security-related activities?

·  Impacts on the public sector. In what ways have homeland security initiatives affected the information activities of local, state, and national government agencies? How have the information access and dissemination roles of libraries changed?

·  Impacts and effects of unauthorized disclosures. What are the security and policy implications for unauthorized leaks such as the WikiLeaks releases, the NSA surveillance disclosures, and various other incidents involving alleged disclosures by individuals to the press?

Other relevant policy-focused topics are welcome.

 

Submission procedure and important dates

The submission procedure will follow the usual norms and regulations of GIQ and Elsevier. In addition, proposals will be evaluated by the guest editors for scope and thematic appropriateness for the special issue, before starting the review process. Below are the expected dates to prepare the issue for publication in 2015:

·  Article proposal due (500 words): February 1, 2014.

·  Proposal notification: February 15, 2014.

·  Full article draft due: May 1, 2014.

·  Peer review results: July 1, 2014.

·  Final revised article due: August 1, 2014.

·  Notification of final acceptance: September 1, 2014.

·  Anticipated Publication: January 2015.

Please, send manuscript proposals to: giq@umd.edu.

 

Call for Papers for Minitrack titled

"ICTs for Financial Inclusion of the Unbanked Poor in Developing Economies"

20th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2014) August 7-10, 2014

 

Track: ICTs for Global Development

 

Minitrack: ICTs for Financial Inclusion of the Unbanked Poor in Developing Economies

 

We are excited to invite articles for this mini-track at the 20th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS 2014) to be held on August 7-10, 2014 in Savannah, Georgia.

AMCIS 2014 brings together academics and industry professionals around the world to exchange knowledge related to the AMCIS 2014 theme, Smart Sustainability, the Information Systems Opportunity. For more information visit: http://amcis2014.aisnet.org

 

Minitrack Description

 

Financial inclusion is critical for global development since it provides financial services at an affordable cost to the poor, who are left out of the formal financial sector. A 2009 study by the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP), a donor consortium affiliated to the World Bank, found that the number of branches per 100,000 adults was only eight in developing countries compared to 24 in developed countries (CGAP, 2009). The CGAP study also established a relationship between lack of access to basic financial services and low incomes. Of the 2.9 billion “unbanked” adults, 2.7 billion were concentrated in developing economies. Traditional financial institutions do not serve the poor, especially in remote locations in rural areas, because it is risky and expensive. The poor are often illiterate and find it difficult to complete the paperwork required for financial services. They cannot also furnish collateral for any loans. Neither do they have any credit histories. The tiny profits from a small loan, or a savings account with a small balance, make it unprofitable for banks to serve the poor (Khavul, 2010).

 

A more pertinent question is whether financial inclusion helps in lifting the poor out of poverty. An empirical study based on data from 160 countries found that access to finance had a positive impact on economic development (Honohan, 2006). The stark impact of financial exclusion can be seen in one statistic: 42% of India’s population, or 490 million people, live under the poverty benchmark of USD1.25 per day at purchasing power parity according to a study published by the United Nations Development Program in 2009.

 

Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are creating new channels to reach the poor through branchless banking. Last-mile technologies such as ATMs (Prodem in Bolivia), mobile phones (Safaricom’s M-Pesa in Kenya, GCash and Smart Money in Philippines), RFID, smart cards (Wizzit in South Africa), biometric identification (FINO in India) and Near Field Communication technologies (ALW’s “bank in a box” in India) are used by microfinance institutions (MFIs), banks, and mobile network operators (Mas, 2009). Information systems also play a role in expanding the number of customers reached. SKS Microfinance and Equitas, two MFIs in India, implemented innovative systems to manage portfolio risk and monitor the performance of field agents, who contact borrowers (Mohan et al., In Press).

 

ICTs have also played a transformational role in creating a new business model to serve the unbanked poor – online microlending. In this model, individual donors give loans to the poor for establishing or expanding their businesses rather than giving charitable handouts to them. Kiva.org was the first to launch a person-to-person website in 2005. As of October 2013, Kiva had reached over 1.5 million borrowers in over 73 countries, disbursing more than USD480 million from over 1 million lenders.

 

Several implementation challenges hinder the objective of using ICTs for promoting financial inclusion in developing economies. An important issue is the use of ICT solutions applied to a poor business process. It is imperative that the business process for effecting financial transactions is streamlined before applying technology solutions. For instance, SKS Microfinance recognized the importance of reengineering the business process first (Mohan and Potnis, 2010). The financial illiteracy of the customer, lack of basic infrastructure in developing economies, and government policies are other barriers to be overcome.

 

Untapped business opportunities at the bottom of the pyramid offer an exciting and lucrative proposition for IT professionals and businesses to develop innovative customer-centric technical solutions, financial products and services to serve the unbanked poor. Such innovations can be instrumental for global development by putting “the tools for a digital economy into the hands of the world’s poor” (Heeks, 2009).

 

 

Suggested Topics

 

We invite papers from the following areas, although contributions are not limited to the topics listed below.

 

1. Frameworks for financial inclusion in developing economies

2. Adoption and continued usage of last-mile technologies for mobile banking

3. Case examples of applications of new technologies and information systems to serve the unbanked poor

4. Case examples of failed initiatives for financial inclusion in developing economies

5. Potential of value-added financial services (e.g., mobile applications) for the bottom of the pyramid

6. Innovative delivery models for financial services and products in the digital economy

7. Business process management issues for serving the unbanked poor

8. Government policies regulating the interplay between actors such as banks, mobile network operators, microfinance institutions, and the poor customers

9. Training for financial literacy of the poor in developing economies

10. Challenges, opportunities, and barriers to the adoption of ICTs by the poor

11. Human-computer interaction issues related to ICTs used for financial inclusion

 

Minitrack Chairs

 

Lakshmi Mohan

School of Business, University at Albany, State University of New York

l.mohan@albany.edu

 

Devendra Potnis

School of Information Sciences, University of Tennessee at Knoxville

dpotnis@utk.edu

 

 

Instructions for Authors and Submission

 

Manuscript submissions for AMCIS 2014 will open in early January 2014. Exact dates and instructions to authors to follow as soon as these are made available.

 

References

 

·        Consultative Group to Assist the Poor. (2009). Financial Access 2009: Measuring Access to Financial Inclusion Around the World. Retrieved from http://www.cgap.org/gm/document-1.9.38735/FA2009.pdf

 

·        Heeks, R. (2009). Emerging Markets: IT and the World’s Bottom Billion. Communications of the ACM, April 22-24.

 

·        Honohan, P. (2006). Household Financial Assets in the Process of Development (Vol. Policy Research Working Paper 3965). Washington, D.C.: World Bank.

 

·        Khavul, S. (2010). Microfinance: Creating Opportunities for the Poor? Academy of Management Perspectives, 24(3), 57-71.

 

·        Mas, I. (2009). The Economics of Branchless Banking. Innovations, 4(2), 57-75.

 

·        Mohan, L., & Potnis, D. (2010). Catalytic Innovation in Microfinance for Inclusive Growth: Insights from SKS Microfinance. Journal of Asia-Pacific Business, 11(Special Issue on Value Creation, Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Global Economies), 218-239.

 

·        Mohan, L., Potnis, D., & Alter, S. (In Press). Using Information Systems to Support “Door-step Banking”: Enabling Scalability of Microfinance to Serve More of the Poor at the Bottom of the Pyramid. Communications of the AIS, 32(Special Issue on Information Systems in Emerging Economies).

 

·        Mohan, L., Potnis, D., & Mattoo, N. (2013). A Pan-India Footprint of Microfinance Borrowers from an Exploratory Survey: Impact of Over-Indebtedness on Financial Inclusion of the Poor. Enterprise Development and Microfinance, 24(1), 55-71.

 

·        Morawczynski, O., & Pickens, M. (2009). Poor People Using Mobile Financial Services: Observations on Customer Usage and Impact from M-PESA. World Bank. Washington, D.C.

·

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

Public Service Innovations through ICT Track

The 18th Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS 2014)

Chengdu, China

Conference: June 24-28, 2014

Track on Public Service Innovations through ICT

 

Over 15 years of electronic government (e-government) research has witnessed the strategic and innovative use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to change public administration practices. These reforms have been found in both developed and developing countries at all levels of government. These innovations have shown real challenges in realizing the potential benefits of e-government for public service delivery. In this Public Service Innovation through ICT Track, we aim to explore public service innovations through ICT use in government, by calling for theoretical and empirical e-government research studies on developed and developing countries worldwide, including public service innovations in the Asia Pacific region. In reflecting the major theme of the 2014 Pacific Asia Conference on Information Systems (PACIS), the proposed Track aims to encourage leading-edge academic researchers worldwide to advance research on public service innovations through ICT in government.

 

 

Suggested Topics include but not limited to:

 

·        Service innovations in public administration

·        Service innovations through open data policies and open data applications

·        Service innovations through big data analytics

·        Service innovations in ICT-enabled crisis, disaster and catastrophe management

·        Service innovations for the vulnerable populations such as the aged and people with disabilities

·        Leveraging social media in government to enhance citizen engagement and citizen co-production of public services

·        Leveraging social media in government to transform public policy governance

·        Social media-enabled crowdsourcing for service innovations

·        Clouds in government for meeting the demands for enhanced service efficiency and service flexibility

·        Smart governments, smart cities and smart communities

·        Measurement of service innovations through multi-research methods

·        The role of leadership and organizational culture in cultivating service innovations in government

·        Transparent and accountable investments in service innovations

·        Service innovation challenges in public administration

 

 

Fast-Track Review for Journal Publication

 

The best papers from this Track can be fast-track reviewed for publication in the Special Issue on "Public Service Innovations through Information and Communications Technology: Theory and Practice" in the International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age (Christopher G. Reddick, Editor-in-Chief). The IJPADA is published by IGI Global.

 

 Paper Submission Deadline: February 15, 2014

 

 Track Co-Chairs

 

Dr. Akemi Takeoka Chatfield, University of Wollongong (Australia) akemi@uow.edu.au

 

Professor Dr. Christopher G. Reddick, The University of Texas at San Antonio (USA)

 

Associate Professor Dr. Hans J. (Jochen) Scholl, The University of Washington (USA)

 

Professor Dr. Toshio Obi, Waseda University (Japan)

 

Dr. Jazem Alanazi, King Saud University (Saudi Arabia)

 

 

Please copy/paste the following URL into your web browser: http://pacis2014.org/initial.php for Initial Submission Guidelines – PACIS 2014

 

 

The Future Internet Journal will be featuring a special issue on the theme of Open Government Meets Social Data.

 

Researchers and practitioners in the digital government community are invited to submit a manuscript that covers various aspects on the theme.  

The summary of the special issue is posted at:

http://www.mdpi.com/journal/futureinternet/special_issues/open-government

The schedule of the submission is as follows:

- A summary abstract:  any time before Nov 1, 2014

- A full manuscript submission:  January 15, 2014.

The review process will be around 2 and 1/2 months.  

Please let me know if you and/or your colleagues are interested in contributing to the special issue.

soon.chun@csi.cuny.edu

 

CFP for the SI on Public Service Innovations through ICT: Theory and Practice - The International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age

 

SUBMISSION DUE DATE: October 31, 2014

 

 SPECIAL ISSUE ON Public Service Innovations through Information and Communication Technologies: Theory and Practice

 

Over 15 years of electronic government (e-government) research has witnessed the strategic and innovative use of information and communication technologies (ICT) to change public administration practices. These reforms have been found in both developed and developing countries at all levels of government. These innovations have shown real challenges in realizing the potential benefits of e-government for public service delivery.

 

 In this Special Issue on Public Service Innovations through ICT: Theory and Practice, we aim to explore public service innovations through ICT use in government, by calling for theoretical and empirical e-government research studies on developed and developing countries worldwide.

 

 

RECOMMENDED TOPICS:

 

Topics to be discussed in this special issue include (but are not limited to) the following:

 

·        Clouds in government for meeting the demands for enhanced service efficiency and service flexibility

·        Leveraging social media in government to enhance citizen engagement and citizen co-production of public services

·        Leveraging social media in government to enhance public policy governance

·        Measurement of service innovations through multi-research methods

·        Service innovation challenges in public administration

·        Service innovations for the vulnerable populations such as the aged and people with disabilities

·        Service innovations in ICT-enabled crisis, disaster and catastrophe management

·        Service innovations in public administration

·        Service innovations through big data analytics

·        Service innovations through open data policies and open data applications

·        Smart governments, smart cities and smart communities

·        Social media-enabled crowdsourcing for service innovations

·        The role of leadership and organizational culture in cultivating service innovations in government

·        Transparent and accountable investments in service innovations

 

 SUBMISSION PROCEDURE:

 

Researchers and practitioners are invited to submit papers for this special theme issue on Public Service Innovations through Information and Communication Technologies: Theory and Practice on or before October 31, 2014.  All submissions must be original and may not be under review by another publication. INTERESTED AUTHORS SHOULD CONSULT THE JOURNAL’S GUIDELINES FOR MANUSCRIPT SUBMISSIONS at http://www.igi-global.com/journals/guidelines-for-submission.aspx. All submitted papers will be reviewed on a double-blind, peer review basis. Papers must follow APA style for reference citations.

 

 All inquires should be should be directed to the attention of:

 

Dr. Akemi Takeoka Chatfield

Guest Editor

The International Journal of Public Administration in the Digital Age (IJPADA)

E-mail: akemi@uow.edu.au

 

All manuscript submissions to the special issue should be sent through the online submission system:

 

http://www.igi-global.com/authorseditors/titlesubmission/newproject.aspx

 

Metadata Intersections: Bridging the Archipelago of Cultural Memory

DC-2014 International Conference and Annual Meeting of DCMI

8-11 October 2014

AT&T Executive Education and Conference Center 

The University of Texas at Austin

 

Call for Participation: http://purl.org/dcevents/dc-2014/cfp

 

Researchers, practicing professionals and students with broad interests in principled metadata design and best practices have gathered annually since 1995 under the DCMI banner to exchange ideas, to discover important common ground, and to work on shared problems. As one of the first broadly inclusive efforts at crowdsourcing expertise on the Web, the DCMI community has been a key player in the evolving information environment of the Web of documents and data.

 

DC-2014 CONFERENCE THEME:

Metadata is fundamental in enabling ubiquitous access to cultural and scientific resources through galleries, libraries, archives and museums (GLAM). While fundamental, GLAM traditions in documentation and organization lead to significant differences in both their languages of description and domain practices. And yet, the push is on for "radically open cultural heritage data" that bridges these differences as well as those across the humanities and the sciences. DC-2014 will explore the role of metadata in spanning the archipelago of siloed cultural memory in an emerging context of linked access to data repositories as well as repositories of cultural artifacts.

 

BEYOND THE THEME:

Submissions of papers, reports, and posters are welcome in all areas of innovative metadata design and best practices. 

 

IMPORTANT DATES:

Peer-Reviewed Papers, Project Reports & Posters:

— Submission Deadline: 3 April 2014

— Author Notification: 12 July 2014

— Final Copy: 16 August 2014

 

Special & Panel Sessions, Workshops:

— Submission Deadline: 3 April 2014

— Author Notification: 1 June 2014

 

Best Practice Posters & Demonstrations

— Submission Deadline: 2 June 2014

— Author Notification: 30 June 2014

 

(All deadlines: Midnight, Pacific Standard Time)

 

Program Committee Chairs:

 

— William Moen, School of Library and Information Sciences, University of North Texas, United States

— Amy Rushing, University of Texas at San Antonio, United States

 

The non-government and voluntary sector, ICT, and democracy  Deadline for extended abstracts: March 1st 2014   The recent award of the Nobel Peace Prize to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has again focused international public attention on the role and importance of Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) in social and political life.  NGOs, together with other groups which rely to a greater or lesser extent on volunteers such as Local Voluntary Organisations (LVOs) often provide services to the community and undertake tasks which government cannot or will not do. The use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the governance and activities of such organisations is a topic of growing interest. The nature, scale and activities of NGOs and LVOs vary enormously both within countries and across countries. In countries with highly developed and extensive welfare states, which include many European countries, the role of NGOs and voluntary or part voluntary organisations will be different than it will be in, say, countries like the USA or in the developing world.  Such organisations range from well-funded, well-resourced and formally structured international organisations such as the Red Cross or the World Wildlife Fund to small local, even ad hoc, loose networks of individuals organised around anything from fund raising for the local school to community gardening or even crowdsourcing. The field of Community Informatics is one in which the use of ICT by LVOs and similar organisations is studied, but there has been little research to date on how and to what extent organisations across this spectrum use ICT for member or citizen engagement and the promotion of internal democratic governance. A particularly interesting question is whether, and if so how, NGOs and LVOs use ICTs internally and externally?  For example, are there instances of such organisations making extremely effective use of ICT for (say) lobbying whilst failing to use it effectively for internal engagement or vice versa?  Are such organisations better at using ICT to promote their values externally than they are at practicing them internally?   For this special issue we are seeking contributions from interdisciplinary research that examines, in different ways, how volunteer spheres use the tools of e-democracy, i.e. how they use ICT to strengthen the organisation's internal democratic structures. We are also calling for applied studies such as usability or design studies of the development of tools for e-democracy for non-governmental organisations. A majority of research in this area is carried out in English–speaking countries and in urban settings, which is why we welcome studies from other perspectives. As the field of Community Informatics and E-democracy continues to be an emerging field we especially welcome studies that show engagement with theory and method.   POSSIBLE TOPICS   Possible themes included (but are not limited to): ·      Studies of the use of e-democracy tools in NGOs and LVOs; ·      Evaluations of commonly used open-source systems in NGOs and citizen engagement, from a democracy perspective; ·      Technology-enhanced cooperation in NGOs and LVOs; ·      Use of technology for lobbying and mobilizing campaigns; ·      ICT support for knowledge management in NGOs and LVOs; ·      On-line democratic culture; ·      Processes of inclusion and exclusion in e-participation; ·      ICT and gender equality in NGOs and LVOs; ·      ICT supported organization of global democratic movements; ·      Security issues in tools and practices for e-democracy in NGOs and LVOs; ·      The use of or potential for e-voting in NGOs and LVOs; ·      Use of pseudonyms in e-citizen engagement; ·      Anonymity and e-democracy; ·      The sociology of ICT use in such organizations; ·      ICT impacts on the internal democratic processes in NGOs and LVOs; ·      Comparative studies of NGOs ICT supported communication practices; ·      ICT supported interaction between NGOs; ·      NGOs internal democratic norms and practices in relation to ICT; ·      Case studies of models and prototypes in e-democracy/e-engagement projects in NGOs and LVOs.    EDITOR   Karin Hansson, Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University & Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm (khansson@dsv.su.se)   EDITORIAL BOARD   ·      Rowena Cullen, Professor Ph.D. Associate Dean, Research, Victoria Business School, University of Wellington ·      Johannes W. Pichler Professor Ph.D. Chair Professor for European Legal Developments. Head of the Department, Dept. for European Legal Developments, Law Faculty, University of Graz ·      Love Ekenberg Professor Ph.D. 
Head of Department
, Dept. of Computer and Systems Sciences, Stockholm University ·      Jeremy Rose Professor Ph.D. Dept. of Communication and Information, University of Skövde ·      Frank Bannister, Associate Professor Ph.D. School of Computer Science and Statistics, Trinity College Dublin ·      Jakob Svensson, Associate Professor Ph.D. Dept. of Geography, Media and Communication Studies, Karlstad University and Informatics and Media, Uppsala university ·      Peter Parycek, Ph.D. Head of Centre, Centre for E-Governance, Danube-University Krems    IMPORTANT DATES   2014 March 1st                     Submission deadline for extended abstracts April 1st                       Notification of acceptance of extended abstract May 1st                       Submission of full paper July 1st                        Submission of final versions September 1st             Planned publication date   SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS   ·      Extended abstracts should be no more than 2-3 pages. ·      Full Papers should be in the range 6000-8000 words. Longer submissions may be considered in exceptional circumstances. ·      Authors are asked to follow the format guidelines at: http://www.ijpis.net/ojs/index.php/IJPIS/about/submissions#authorGuidelines   The International Journal of Public Information Systems is listed in Cabell's Directory of Publishing Opportunities, The Directory of Open Access Journals, and EBSCOhost.

  Further information is available at: http://www.ijpis.net/ojs/index.php/IJPIS/index .

 

Catherine G. Mkude needs your help to complete a survey on e-government systems design in developed and developing countries 

 

Catherine G. Mkude, a PhD researcher at the University of Koblenz-Landau in Germany is working on a framework for e-government systems design for developing countries. In her research, she is investigating e-government strategies, programmes and projects (applications, infrastructures, comprehensive solutions, etc.) in developed and in developing countries. In doing so, she wants to determine how developing countries can leverage from the more successful e-government endeavours in developed countries.

Catherine is currently in a stage of collecting information on experiences, practices and solutions in 5 domains of e-government implementation in developed and developing countries. These domains are (1) electronic public services, (2) electronic participation, (3) application of information and communication technologies (ICT) in policy making processes, (4) e-government infrastructure and, (5) evaluation and sustainability of e-government.

Therefore Catherine kindly ask you to participate in a survey, which investigates these domains through separate questionnaires. She would highly appreciate if you could fill in one (or even more) of the below questionnaires. The responses for the questionnaires are entirely confidential and anonymous.

The following links direct you to the respective questionnaire per domain. The approximated time to fill in a questionnaire is also indicated below. Please choose the link(s) of the domain(s) you feel most comfortable to answer.

1. Domain electronic public services:  http://cmkude.limequery.com/index.php/983413/lang-en. Approximate time is 40 minutes. 2. Domain electronic participation: http://cmkude.limequery.com/index.php/388819/lang-en. Approximate time is 40 minutes. 3. Domain ICT in policy making:  http://cmkude.limequery.com/index.php/776413/lang-en. Approximate time is 35 minutes. 4. Domain e-government infrastructure:  http://cmkude.limequery.com/index.php/375388/lang-en. Approximate time is 30 minutes. 5. Domain e-government evaluation and sustainability:  http://cmkude.limequery.com/index.php/582399/lang-en. Approximate time is 30 minutes.

Catherine appreciates and thanks you in advance for your time and contributions. If you are aware of someone who I can ask to fill in either of the questionnaires, please Catherine know by email and she will invite them.

For further questions and suggestions please contact: Catherine G. Mkude Research Group E-Government, Institute for Information Systems Research University of Koblenz-Landau Universitätsstr 1 56070 Koblenz, Germany cmkude@uni-koblenz.de URL: http://www.uni-koblenz.de/agvinf/

 

Budapest, May 8-9, 2014 CFP- Policy practice and digital science: Integrating complex systems, social simulation and public administration in policy research

This explosive growth in data, computational power, and social media creates new opportunities for policy-making and research. To take advantage of these development in the digital world new approaches, concepts, instruments and methods are needed which are able to deal with societal and computational complexity. This requires the knowledge traditionally found in different disciplines including public administration, policy analyses, information systems, complex systems and computer science. The aim of this book is to provide the foundation for this new interdisciplinary field in which various traditional disciplines are blending.

This books aims at being the first comprehensive book in which the various development and disciplines will be covered from the complete policy-making perspective. A wide range of aspects for social and professional networking and multidisciplinary constituency building along the axes of technology, participative processes, governance, policy modelling, social simulation and visualisation. This should result in a comprehensive overview of the foundations, theories, models, approaches, applications and developments in this domain. 

The type of contributions can be new approaches, concepts, instruments and methods are needed, theoretical and modelling foundations, cross-disciplinary research and best practices or comparative studies.

 TOPICS

* Modelling approaches and combination of modeling approaches to solve policy problems * Agent-based modeling, simulation, social network modeling and analysis * Use of information communication technologies for social computing * Complex system, complex adaptive systems * Policy informatics, evidence-based policy, foundation and changes in policy making * Policy formulation, implementation, execution, evaluation * Computational sciences * Prediction, Policy and Planning, Environment * Social Systems, Economics and Finance  * Public-Private service Networks  * Complexity thinking and methodological, influence and practice challenges * Conceptual frameworks * Influence of Web.2.0, public engagements, community of practices * Crowdsourcing, experts involvement * Use of open data in policy making * Evolution, designing, morphing * Achievements of Web service networks * Web 3.0, issues, results, and challenges * The impact of agent technologies on policy modelling * Integrating different models (discrete, dynamics, ..) * Agent-based experimenting, dynamics and validations * Visualization, dissemination and communication

IMPORTANT DATES Authors are encouraged to submit an abstract for appropriateness with the book to m.f.w.h.a.janssen@tudelft.nl and A.Deljoo@tudelft.nl.

* Chapter submission deadline: 15 December 2013 * Acceptance notification: 15 February 2014 * Camera ready submission: 1 April 2014

This book is scheduled to be published by Springer Science in the Public Administration and Information Technology series edited Christopher G. Reddick. (http://www.springer.com/series/10796).

 

European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS) 2014

Call for Papers

Track 23: The Digital Public Sector

9-11 June, 2014

Tel Aviv, Israel

 

The track theme on “The Digital Public Sector” invites submissions related to the internal as well as the external IS perspectives on public sector digitalization. Information systems in the public sector represent both traditional IS research perspectives in relation to implementation and use, as well as novel themes driven by the emergence of new technologies and behaviors of use of information and communication technologies (ICT) among citizens and public sector institutions.

 Big data, open data, and social media represent key research challenges in the core domain of IS. With the increase of digitization in society, the pressure on the public sector to digitize its interaction and work processes have increased too. Citizens expect that they can access public institutions anytime and anywhere using a variety of digital tools. In their daily life, digital modes of interaction are important to citizens. Most of these interactions are driven by unstructured platforms that do not necessarily fit the more formal and bureaucratic mode of communication customary of public institutions. This represents a challenge both for citizens and for public sector.

 The public sector has for decades invested in ICT to streamline its processes. This is not visible to citizens because it is running in the background, only providing a fraction of high quality digital services that represent real value to the citizens. A perspective that is less explored, pertains to the implications of the increased pressure on public institutions when interactions with citizens become more direct thanks to digitalization.

 A topic of inquiry that is still to be explored and understood in the domain of public sector ICT is the emergence of open data. Some governments provide open data sets and data streams that can be utilized by private businesses and citizens. Open data challenges the public sectors’ data monopoly and along with new opportunities also generate new types of threats related to security and privacy.

 TOPICS OF INTEREST. Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

·        Digital-analog work balance in public sector

·        Business models for the digital public sector

·        E-government policy, implementation and practice

·        The digital civil servant – government driven by robots and business intelligence

·        Public sector and emerging technologies – bureaucracy and innovation

·        Multi-channel interaction with citizens

·        Mechanisms for increased uptake of e-services among citizens

·        Regulatory enforcement as digitalization driver

·        Community – based public service models

·        Co-development of e-services utilizing open data from public sector

·        Smart Cities

·        Business models for open data provision

·        Risks and opportunities related to public big data

·        Data and process interoperability guidelines

·        Public information processing (data and text mining, sentiment analysis, reputation management)

·        Strategies, use and implications of cloud computing in the public sector

IMPORTANT DATES

Paper Submission begins: 1 November, 2013 Call for Papers Submission Deadline Date: 8 December, 2013 Notification of acceptance: 3 March, 2014 Panel submission deadline: 5 March, 2014 Final version of accepted papers due: 30 March, 2014 Early Bird Registration closes: 16 April, 2014

Sponsorship

Best papers will be fast tracked at Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy

 Track Chairs

Helle Zinner Henriksen, Copenhagen Business School (corresponding track chair) hzh.itm@cbs.dk

Kim Normann Andersen, Aalborg University kandersen@dps.aau.dk

Marijn Janssen, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands M.F.W.H.A.Janssen@tudelft.nl

 

 

Job opportunities

 

 

Open Rank Professor of Government Information Strategy and Management – University at Albany

 The Department of Public Administration & Policy in the University at Albany’s Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy seeks to hire an established or emerging tenure-track scholar to join our nationally-ranked and expanding program in Government Information Strategy and Management (GISM). The successful candidate will be appointed to the Department of Public Administration and Policy in Rockefeller College and will have a research home in the internationally recognized Center for Technology in Government.

 The GISM specialty at Albany represents multi-disciplinary areas characterized by social and technical complexity; networks and cross-boundary information and knowledge sharing; policy problems associated with governance, privacy, information access, and intellectual property; burgeoning information types, uses, and volumes; and many forms of technical, organizational, and institutional change. The issues of interest occur at every level of government from municipal to international and cross the boundaries of public, private, and civil sectors. The successful candidate in GISM will belong to a cohort of nine new faculty across the University who will collaborate on externally-funded cross-disciplinary research, generate a stream of refereed publications across diverse fields, and engage in innovative teaching and mentoring of undergraduate, masters, and PhD students. 

 For the full job description and application please go to

http://albany.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp;jsessionid=45E8C7D92A6808DCB10A03A00EDE4AC6?JOBID=43949

 

Open Rank Professor of Information, Government and Democratic Society – University at Albany

 The Informatics Department of the College of Computing and Information, University at Albany seeks candidates for an open rank, tenure-track faculty position with a focus on role, use, influence, and consequences of information and information communication technologies (ICTs) in government and democratic society beginning fall 2014. The successful candidate will teach courses that emphasize relevant analytical information science approaches such as system dynamics, network analysis, systems integration, or cyber-security at all levels in the Informatics Department as well as be part of the team that makes significant contributions to the research and innovation project portfolios at the Center for Technology in Government.

 Questions :igdssearch2014@albany.edu.  

Information and application: http://bit.ly/1co10Vb

 

Director of the Interdisciplinary Ph.D. Program in Information Science – University at Albany

Open rank tenure-track faculty position beginning fall 2014 for the director of the program in the College of Computing and Information. The successful candidate will have an established record of interdisciplinary scholarship with demonstrated potential to develop programs that cross over multiple units in a comprehensive research university. Applicants must have a Ph.D. in Computer Science or Information Science or a closely related discipline. Candidates applying at the level of Associate or Full Professor position must also have a strong record of funded research.

Review of applications will begin January 15, 2014.

E-mailphdsearch2014@albany.edu

Websitehttp://albany.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=44921

 

Funding opportunities

 

Mexico

For funding opportunities in Mexico, please check the website of the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACYT). The CONACYT performs the role in Mexico as the National Science Foundation in the U.S. Here is the direct link to new calls: http://www.conacyt.mx/Convocatorias/Paginas/default.aspx

 

Other Resources

 

Mobile Code Sharing Catalog Snippet: Leaflet (10/25/2013)

Check out Leaflet, available on the Mobile Code Sharing Catalog, a modern open-source JavaScript library for mobile-friendly interactive maps. http://blog.howto.gov/2013/10/25/mobile-code-sharing-catalog-snippet-leaflet/

 

E-Government Reference Library (EGRL 8.0) Published - now with 5,050 References

Dr. Hans Jochen Scholl and group published version 8.0 of the e-Gov Reference Library (EGRL), which now contains 5,050 references of predominantly English language, peer-reviewed work in the study domains of electronic government and electronic governance. The number of qualifying references in the library has increased by 376, or 8 percent over version 7.5 (December 15, 2011). The e-Gov Reference Library has developed into an indispensable tool for e-Gov scholars. In particular, reviewing paper submissions was reported to now heavily rely on this reference library. Packaged in a 10 MB zip file, bibTeX, EndNote, and Zotero versions along with PDF, text, and rtf versions are available. For further information please visit: http://faculty.washington.edu/jscholl/2012/06/13

 

 Onlineitdegree.net a useful online resource

Onlineitdegree.net was created as an online informational resource for individuals looking to pursue IT Degree-related education and careers. Over the years, we have compiled a great many resources that span the realm of information science, including programming languages, computer software and software engineering, and information systems. Our goal with these resources is to contribute to and benefit one’s study of IT, whether in the classroom or professional world notwithstanding. In addition, we provide information on current job market trends and what educational paths would be sufficient for one looking to carve out a career in information technology.  You can find all the resources @ http://www.onlineitdegree.net